Twitter: Being smart is great but you don’t have to prove it all the time

Message to all the self-promoting Twitter users out there: give it a rest. There’s nothing worse in the old school world of real life than having a conversation with someone that only talks about their own achievements.

In fact, it’s completely hideous: “Did I tell you about the time I achieved something brilliant? Actually, that . . . → Read More: Twitter: Being smart is great but you don’t have to prove it all the time

Mobility plus marketing equals a new opportunity for the CIO

How has the last year-or-so been for you? Have you spent time with your head done in the IT department, managing and implementing the latest technology system? Or have you been more adventurous and moved beyond the confines of IT?

I’ve spoken to a number of CIOs recently who have suggested that they now spend . . . → Read More: Mobility plus marketing equals a new opportunity for the CIO

Five tips to help a CIO prioritise succession planning

You’ve finally got the job you always wanted – you’re CIO at a good organisation, with a direct line to the board and good support from the chief executive.

Good for you, but what about the rest of your team? Do you ever give a second’s thought for who comes next, or are you singularly . . . → Read More: Five tips to help a CIO prioritise succession planning

Is Apple iPad an expensive marketing gimmick?

Have you bought an Apple iPad? Are you thinking about buying a Samsung Galaxy Tab? Maybe you think the whole move towards tablet devices is nothing more than a marketing exercise?

Well, medical device specialist Medtronic is probably one of the earliest and biggest corporate buyers of Apple iPad. ComputerWorld reports that CIO Michael Hedges . . . → Read More: Is Apple iPad an expensive marketing gimmick?

The rise of the executive generalist

There’s a lot of talk about line-of-business and how executives from different areas have to listen, and then play, to the demands of leaders from other areas. That’s true but the status quo is also more subtle than that.

Rather than just listening, the modern line-of-business executive has to operate across multiple areas. CIOs, for . . . → Read More: The rise of the executive generalist